Accelerating the Future...

News Page Banner Image

In his first post on the Future Of Education Adi emphasised that, "If the people of today are to adapt to the winds of change better than those of previous generations, then education is going to have to change." Indeed, a decade  ago Ken Robinson, British author, speaker and international advisor on education, gave a seminal talk at The RSA (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce), the essence of which is captured in one of the RSA's animated videos.

My alt text

In his second post Adi argues for the need for, and benefits of, experiential learning. Watching the linked video makes it clear why experiential learning is more important today than ever before: in our fast paced and fast changing world all of us are coming face to face with new situations, more and more frequently. This means that all of us need to learn to engage with and react to them, in the moment. Experiential learning prepares us for that.

My alt text

In his third post on the Future Of Education, Adi makes an argument for the value that generalists bring, particularly in the entrepreneurial context. Yet this view does not seem to be shared by investors. While I can see why knowing a little about a lot can be very valuable for entrepreneurs, I am wondering whether it is rather an ‘opposable mind’, as Roger Martin calls it, is what really makes the difference. According to Roger, the ‘opposable mind' refers to the human brain’s ability “to hold two conflicting ideas in constructive tension”, which he found to be the driver for the many managerial and start-up success stories he analysed. He continues, describing an opposable mind as an, “intellectually advantageous evolutionary leap through which decision-makers can synthesize new and superior ideas.” I love the concept of the opposable mind, not least as it gets us away from the ‘either - or’ thinking that is so prevalent. Listen to his own words here.

In his fourth and last posts in this miniseries on the Future Of Education, Adi focuses on AI and technology in the classroom. It seems that all digitalisation is currently being used for is to transfer the same content that has been delivered face to face into the virtual realm. What a missed opportunity! There is so much more potential.  A biology class, recorded once, to the highest possible standard both on terms of content and in terms of delivery, can be received by countless students. This could free up the time of teachers, who could then focus on skillsets that cannot be acquired by watching a video, that can only be acquired through experience, reflection and probably some unlearning. Such learning is also known as ‘double loop learning’, which is what is needed in particular in fast moving, uncertain context - like the one we are experiencing now. Former Royal Marines Officer @Roceric Yapp explains this beautifully in his TED Talk.  

My alt text

My alt text

Accelerating the Future...

Copyright 2020. Katerva — Accelerating the Future.